FRAMBESIA TROPICAL PDF

Yaws, or frambesia, is essentially a tropical infectious and contagious disease caused by Spirochaeta pertenuis and characterized by a frambesiform granulomatous eruption. Our knowledge of yaws is due to the following investigators: Charlouis, 1 who in proved by actual experiment that syphilis and yaws are two distinct maladies. This investigator inoculated thirty-two Chinese prisoners with crusts and scrapings from yaws lesions, and in twenty-eight instances succeeded in producing characteristic yaws. He also succeeded in inoculating a native suffering from yaws with syphilis, thereby definitely disproving the assumption that the two conditions were one and the same.

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Yaws is a common name, especially in English colonies. Pian is the name given by the French. Bouba or boubas is used in the Spanish colonies. The disease has many local names among different aboriginal peoples. It has also been affirmed that it occupied its place under the generic term "leprosy" of the Bible. Like syphilis, frambesia was "discovered" after the discovery.

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Yaws: A forgotten disease

NCBI Bookshelf. Luke Maxfield ; Jonathan S. Authors Luke Maxfield 1 ; Jonathan S. Crane 2. Yaws is most commonly seen among children in tropical regions and is spread by skin-to-skin contact. The disease is characterized by an acute phase followed by a chronic, relapsing course in a minority of patients. Clinically, the disease is comprised of distinct stages similar to venereal syphilis with cutaneous findings in early stages, and after a latent period, late yaws may manifest as gummatous nodules, scarring, and destructive bone lesions.

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Frambesia tropica

Yaws is a common name, especially in English colonies. Pian is the name given by the French. Bouba or boubas is used in the Spanish colonies. The disease has many local names among different aboriginal peoples. It has also been affirmed that it occupied its place under the generic term "leprosy" of the Bible. Like syphilis, frambesia was "discovered" after the discovery. Arch Derm Syphilol.

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A STUDY OF A CASE OF YAWS (FRAMBESIA TROPICA) CONTRACTED BY AN AMERICAN SOLDIER IN FRANCE

Yaws , also called frambesia , contagious disease occurring in moist tropical regions throughout the world. It is caused by a spirochete , Treponema pertenue , that is structurally indistinguishable from T. Some syphilologists contend that yaws is merely a tropical rural form of syphilis, but yaws is not contracted primarily through sexual activity, and later systemic complications from the disease are much rarer than in syphilis. The Wassermann and Kahn tests for syphilis, however, often read positive with yaws, and there is some degree of cross-immunity. The spirochetes of yaws are present in the discharge from lesions on the skin and are transferred by direct contact to the abraded skin of an uninfected person; by contaminated clothing; and by flies that feed on the sores. The disease is most frequently contracted in early childhood, and considerable immunity to subsequent infection is acquired. Yaws has three stages.

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