HPCA ACT 2003 PDF

Changes authorised by subpart 2 of Part 2 of the Legislation Act have been made in this official reprint. This Act is administered by the Ministry of Health. This section and sections 1 , 5 , 6 , and come into force on the day on which this Act receives the Royal assent. Sections 52 to 63 , and come into force on the 28th day after the date on which this Act receives the Royal assent.

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The Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act the Act provides a framework for the regulation of health practitioners in order to protect the public where there is a risk of harm from professional practice.

Having one legislative framework allows for consistent procedures and terminology across the professions now regulated by the Act. The principal purpose of protecting the health and safety of the public is emphasised and the Act includes mechanisms to ensure that practitioners are competent and fit to practise their professions for the duration of their professional lives.

The Act was passed by Parliament on 11 September and received the Royal assent on 18 September The Act came fully into force on 18 September In doing so, the Act repealed 11 occupational statutes governing 13 professions. Not all health professions are regulated under the Act.

Not being regulated under the Act does not imply that a profession lacks professional standards. Some are not regulated because they pose little risk of harm to the public; some are not regulated because they work under the supervision of a regulated profession; some are regulated in other ways.

For example, they may be regulated through their employer or self-regulated by their profession. Skip to main content. Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act. Non-regulated health professions. Restricted activities under the Act. Quality assurance activities under the Act. Responsible authorities under the Act. Regulating a new profession. Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act publications. Page last reviewed: 28 February Share this page on some of the most popular social networking and content sites on the internet.

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Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003 (HPCA Act)

The Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act the Act provides a framework for the regulation of health practitioners in order to protect the public where there is a risk of harm from professional practice. Having one legislative framework allows for consistent procedures and terminology across the professions now regulated by the Act. The principal purpose of protecting the health and safety of the public is emphasised and the Act includes mechanisms to ensure that practitioners are competent and fit to practise their professions for the duration of their professional lives. The Act was passed by Parliament on 11 September and received the Royal assent on 18 September The Act came fully into force on 18 September In doing so, the Act repealed 11 occupational statutes governing 13 professions. Not all health professions are regulated under the Act.

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Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act 2003

The Act sets out the rules for the way practitioners are registered, the process for complaints and how professional competence is maintained and assessed. The Act includes ways to make sure health practitioners are competent and fit to practice their professions for the duration of their professional lives. Having one Act for the regulation of health professionals means there are consistent procedures and terminology across all those professions. Examples of other health practitioners currently covered by this Act include doctors, nurses, midwives, chiropractors, dentists, dental hygienists, psychotherapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, medical laboratory scientists and many others. The Minister of Health can, under section 9 of the HPCA Act, restrict certain activities to registered health practitioners when, after consultation, the Minister is satisfied that there is a risk of serious or permanent harm from the activity. The current list of restricted activities was consulted on and agreed in

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