IMMEDIATE FICTION JERRY CLEAVER PDF

You need to practice and you need to learn. Put your butt in the seat and do it. But how? Maybe you need some guidance or some inspiration.

Author:Arashiramar Taramar
Country:Papua New Guinea
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:History
Published (Last):2 June 2006
Pages:395
PDF File Size:14.70 Mb
ePub File Size:3.95 Mb
ISBN:735-7-68305-527-3
Downloads:74931
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Dairg



By Jerry Cleaver. Covering the entire process from story building to manuscript preparation and marketing, Jerry Cleaver shows the novice and experienced writer how to start writing and how to get immediate results. Readers will find everything they need to know about managing time, finding an idea, getting the first word down on the page, staying unblocked, shaping ideas into compelling stories, and submitting their work to agents and publishers.

Immediate Fiction goes beyond the old "Write what you know" to "Write what you can imagine. Believing that all writing is rewriting, Cleaver says, "You can't control what you put on the page. You can only control what you leave on the page. A good story cannot be denied. It hits you before you have time to think. It touches your heart before it reaches your head. I have to stop and see what is happening.

The craft and techniques of Immediate Fiction are those used by all great writers. The craft is identical. A good story creates an experience and puts you in it, living and feeling it as if you were there. But this is also about crafting and creating stories and about how to get yourself to sit down and do it. With Immediate Fiction, you will begin writing immediately, the moment you sit down. There are even techniques to help you sit down. Ninety percent of life is showing up, the saying goes.

Immediate Fiction will make it easy to show up. What you create is immediate, and how you create is immediate. Problems are as big or as small as you make them. Writers have a knack for magnifying tiny troubles into great obstacles. This course is laid out with first things first.

The theory gives you a deeper sense of how things work. The first chapter covers the creative process—what to keep in mind to stay out of trouble. Chapter 2 is a short exploration of stories the why of story—why every reader reads, why every writer writes. That flows right into chapter 3, the actual craft and technique of creating stories—how to do it— how, what, when, and where.

You start writing at the end of chapter 3, with exercises designed to uncover what you have and tap into the drama in your ideas. Each chapter has its own set of writing exercises at the end.

Chapter 4 refines the story elements more precisely, making it even easier to breathe life into your story. Chapter 5 covers self-editing, staying on track, avoiding pitfalls—figuring out what you have and what to do with it.

Capturing emotion on the page, and evoking it in the character and the reader, are covered in chapter 6. Chapter 7 covers the basic technique for creating the experience on the page in full scenes. Chapter 8 moves into expanded rewriting techniques—what to do when you go back over your work. Work methods, different ways of approaching your story, are covered in chapter 9. Originality what is it?

That chapter also explores universal plot forms. Chapter 11 covers point of view. If you feel you have no time to write, chapter 12 will show you how to get going in just minutes a day.

Chapter 13 covers extraneous concepts and methods that often confuse the issue—what you can do without. Chapter 14 explores the difference between a short story and a novel and how you can turn any short story into a novel. Chapter 16 shows you how to turn your story into a stage play or screenplay if either is your goal.

Chapter 17 covers what you need to know to market your work—how to submit, where to submit, agents, publishers. Even though the chapters are arranged in a specific order, each stands alone and deals with its topic completely. I took my first writing course at night at a junior college in Chicago. I took it just to pick up a few credits while I was working and saving money to go back to college full-time. I had no idea what I was doing in the writing class, but I had a lot of energy, and I had no conceptions or misconceptions because I had almost no literary background.

The teacher and the class liked my writing. I was thrilled and started thinking that maybe, someday, after I got a degree in a sensible subject, I would do some writing. Our night class produced the first literary magazine in the Chicago junior college system.

I went back to school full-time at the University of Illinois, majoring in psychology but writing in my spare time. After a year, I took another writing class, taught by a professor who was a well-known author. I was excited and eager, a serious student ready to be molded into a successful writer by this literary expert. Why did my clear ideas so often drift off into tangled messes?

What should I do when a story I was writing that was full of energy and drama suddenly shut down and stopped dead before my eyes, never to rise again? Unfortunately, the professor had few answers. He told us little about how stories work. Write a twenty-five-hundred-word story for next week, he said. The following week he proceeded to take our writing apart, telling us what was wrong with it, but little about how to fix it.

At the end of the course I had more questions than I had when I started, including: Was it beyond me? Was I just too dense? The next time I had an elective, I took another writing course from a different professor. By now I had formulated my confusion a touch more. I kept wondering, Does it have to be this hard, this vague, this disorganized?

It seemed like guesswork, trial and error, hit or miss, with no real guiding principles or techniques. Does everybody do it this way? I asked in class one day. Look, he said. What was he saying?

Do it his way or get out? You work and work and work, and eventually you start to get a feel for it. It takes years.

Here I was again with more questions. How many? When did you start to get a feel for it? What was it anyway? Did it hit you all at once, or did you get it little by little?

What did the feel feel like, exactly? How did you know if the feel you were feeling was the real feel? After all, what did I know? Still, it seemed there should be a better way. The more I wrote, the more possibilities I could see. My big fear was that I would follow the wrong one and drift off in a direction that would take me nowhere. If my aim was off just a fraction at the start, I might miss the mark by a mile.

Next, I took what I call the shit course. The first day, he swaggered in, looked at us with contempt, and said, What makes you think the shit you write is worth reading? What makes you think the world needs to hear anything you have to say? Uh oh! Here was something else to worry about.

Was my writing worth reading? Did the world need it? How could I know that? I was here because I liked writing. I just wanted to learn to be a good storyteller. It turned out that this teaching style was common at that university.

We know everything. You know nothing was their motto, and this professor and author could have been their poster boy. He told us we were shit and then proceeded to shit on us and our writing throughout the entire course. He was scary, but I held on, clinging to the hope that he was wrong.

It turned out that he was wrong—totally wrong.

CARTOMAGIA FUNDAMENTAL VICENTE CANUTO PDF

Immediate Fiction

Covering the entire process from story building to manuscript preparation and marketing, Jerry Cleaver shows the novice and experienced writer how to start writing and how to get immediate results. Readers will find everything they need to know about managing time, finding an idea, getting the first word down on the page, staying unblocked, shaping ideas into compelling stories, and submitting their work to agents and publishers. Immediate Fiction goes beyond the old "Write what you know" to "Write what you can imagine. Believing that all writing is rewriting, Cleaver says, "You can't control what you put on the page. You can only control what you leave on the page. Jerry Cleaver distills the creative writing process down into a simple formula anyone can understand.

BUILDING AND USING BALUNS AND NOUNS PDF

Immediate Fiction: A Complete Writing Course

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days When will my order arrive? Home Contact us Help Free delivery worldwide. Free delivery worldwide. Bestselling Series. Harry Potter.

AXIAL XR10 MANUAL PDF

Immediate Fiction by Jerry Cleaver

By Jerry Cleaver. Covering the entire process from story building to manuscript preparation and marketing, Jerry Cleaver shows the novice and experienced writer how to start writing and how to get immediate results. Readers will find everything they need to know about managing time, finding an idea, getting the first word down on the page, staying unblocked, shaping ideas into compelling stories, and submitting their work to agents and publishers. Immediate Fiction goes beyond the old "Write what you know" to "Write what you can imagine. Believing that all writing is rewriting, Cleaver says, "You can't control what you put on the page.

Related Articles