CHUANG TZU THOMAS MERTON PDF

Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? The Chinese sage abounds in wit and paradox and shattering insights into the true ground of being. Thomas Merton, no stranger to Asian thought, brings a vivid, modern idiom to the timeless wisdom of Tao. Read more Read less.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Thomas Merton Translator. Chuang Tzu—considered, along with Lao Tzu, one of the great figures of early Taoist thought—used parables and anecdotes, allegory and paradox, to illustrate that real happiness and freedom are found only in understanding the Tao or Way of nature, and dwelling in its unity.

The respected Trappist monk Thomas Merton spent several years reading and reflecting upon four differ Chuang Tzu—considered, along with Lao Tzu, one of the great figures of early Taoist thought—used parables and anecdotes, allegory and paradox, to illustrate that real happiness and freedom are found only in understanding the Tao or Way of nature, and dwelling in its unity.

The respected Trappist monk Thomas Merton spent several years reading and reflecting upon four different translations of the Chinese classic that bears Chuang Tzu's name. The result is this collection of poetic renderings of the great sage's work that conveys its spirit in a way no other translation has and that was Merton's personal favorite among his more than fifty books.

Both prose and verse are included here, as well as a short section from Merton discussing the most salient themes of Chuang Tzu's teachings. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages.

Published March 9th by Shambhala first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Way of Chuang Tzu , please sign up. Should I just read the book straight? Or do I need to have like source materials and stuff to get the full experience? A J You do not need anything, just enjoy Merton's poetic simplicity in bringing Zhuangzi's teaching to life.

See 2 questions about The Way of Chuang Tzu…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 4. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. The Way of Chuang Tzu, Zhuangzi, Thomas Merton As free, interpretive readings, this book is very much Thomas Merton's own, the result of five years of reading, study and meditation. Chuang Tzu, the most spiritual of the classic Chinese philosophers, is the chief historical spokesman for Taoism. Through his writings and those of other Taoist sages, Indian Buddhism was transformed in China into what is now known by its Japanese name - Zen.

Sep 21, Jokoloyo rated it it was amazing. The introduction chapters are gems by themselves, reflecting the rays of bright mind of the author. The poetry part from Chuang Tzu is the main course and maybe the part that you would re-read again and again, even only for some of them. View 2 comments. If you like to read about spirituality and are tolerant of its many forms and traditions, then this book may be just the thing for you. It is a selection from the writings of an early Daoist philosopher, chosen and rendered into English by an American Catholic Trappist monk with a great sympathy for zen Buddhism.

Oh, and it possesses a brief preface by his Holiness, the Dalai Lama. Confucian practice comes in for much criticism in this book, but I think this is because Daoism is concerned about t If you like to read about spirituality and are tolerant of its many forms and traditions, then this book may be just the thing for you. Confucian practice comes in for much criticism in this book, but I think this is because Daoism is concerned about the experience of being and enlightenment, whereas Confucianism is concerned with the proprieties of social behavior.

If Chuang Tzu rails at the students of Confucianism, he does so in much the same spirit with which Jesus criticizes the scribes and the pharisees. He wishes to lead them past the practices to the heart within all of us. Thomas Merton is not fluent in Chinese, and does not claim to be, but as he is a real poet his Chang Tzu renditions travel to the heart within all of us too. If he shoots for a brass buckle He is already nervous. If he shoots for a prize of gold He goes blind or sees two targets— he is out of his mind!

His skill has not changed. But the prize Divides him. He cares. He thinks more of winning Than of shooting— And the need to wind Drains him of power. The greatest politeness Is free of all formality. Perfect conduct is free of concern.

Perfect wisdom Is unplanned. Perfect love Is without demonstrations. Perfect sincerity offers No guarantee. The earth, for example, is broad and vast But of all that expanse a man uses only a few inches Upon which he happens to be standing.

Now suppose you suddenly take away All that he is not actually using So that, all around his fee a gulf Yawns, and he stands in the Void, With nowhere solid except right under each foot: How long will he be able to use what he is using?

View 1 comment. Shelves: asian-history-thought. This is one of the first books I read some time ago after first reading the Chuang Tzu. Read it because I needed to read other interpretations of the Chuang Tzu.

Even given that Merton did not read Chinese, I still think that his is a unique perspective, perhaps because he more than anyone el This is one of the first books I read some time ago after first reading the Chuang Tzu. Even given that Merton did not read Chinese, I still think that his is a unique perspective, perhaps because he more than anyone else who has interpreted the Chuang Tzu has 'lived' the Chuang Tzu. Well think about it and read about how a Trappist monk lives.

It is a life reduced to essentials and a life where the material life most of us cannot avoid living plays little part. But, I am suggesting that he was uniquely qualified to do so and that his perspective is a very valuable one.

View all 4 comments. Very enjoyable and well worth while reading! Curiously, when I first read it I felt it wasn't up to 5 stars, and gave it a 3. However on recent re-read, I now rate it a full five stars. Not sure what has changed about me to make such a change in my perception of the writing, but on this read even the introduction stood out as exceptionally entertaining.

And now I find myself going to it from time-to-time to partake of its charm and wisdom. It is a truly refreshing and delightful book of wise humo Very enjoyable and well worth while reading! It is a truly refreshing and delightful book of wise humour. Or, perhaps, humous wisdom. A couple of paragraphs from Merton's introduction stand out as worthy of citing: [My:] 'readings' [of Chuang Tzu:] are not attempts at faithful reproduction but ventures in personal and spiritual interpretation.

Inevitably, any rendering of Chuang Tzu is bound to be very personal. Though, from the point of view of scholarship, I am not even a dwarf sitting on the shoulders of these giants, and though not all my renderings can even qualify as 'poetry,' I believe that a certain type of reader will enjoy my intuitive approach to a thinker who is subtle, funny, provocative, and not easy to get at 9.

In other words, it is not a new apologetic subtlety I simply like Chuang Tzu because he is what he is and I feel no need to justify this liking to myself or to anyone else. He is far too great to need any apologies from me The Tao is regarded as mysterious, immune to description. Taoism's legendary founder, Lao Tzu who may not have existed , states that "The name that can be named is not the constant name. Any attempt to define the Tao seems so fundamentally at odds with what Taoism is about.

It is easy to get stuck and to resign oneself to a search for something vague but promising, something that unifies and quiets the soul. Yet, if Taoism is viewed as cosmic energy that operates dialectically force, counter force, equilibrium , the Taoist epigrams of Chuang Tzu begin to make some sense. Ultimate reality is not a thing, but energy that pervades all the cosmos, nature, human relationships.

Energy, while formless, manifests itself in matter that moves in certain ways that reflect its inner makeup. Matter acts and matter reacts until equilibrium is achieved. That balance is then upset and this prompts new dialectic cycles. Absolute, Eternal stasis where time stops has no place in Taoism.

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The Way of Chuang Tzu

The experience has been almost diametrically opposed to previous experiences. I found it helpful to see Taoism through the eyes of a western contemplative. The rather special nature of this book calls for some explanation. The texts from Chuang Tzu assembled here are the result of five years of reading, study, annotation, and meditation.

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On Chuang Tzu

The Way of Chuang Tzu. Thomas Merton. Chuang Tzu—considered, along with Lao Tzu, one of the great figures of early Taoist thought—used parables and anecdotes, allegory and paradox, to illustrate that real happiness and freedom are found only in understanding the Tao or Way of nature, and dwelling in its unity. The respected Trappist monk Thomas Merton spent several years reading and reflecting upon four different translations of the Chinese classic that bears Chuang Tzu's name. The result is this collection of poetic renderings of the great sage's work that conveys its spirit in a way no other translation has and that was Merton's personal favorite among his more than fifty books. Both prose and verse are included here, as well as a short section from Merton discussing the most salient themes of Chuang Tzu's teachings. Readings from Chuang Tzu.

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